Searching for North American Harvard 2891 – Redux

If you’re missing some background information on this story that started late in December 2013 when someone commented on this blog which is a spin-off blog from RCAF 403 Squadron.

This is the original post.

Searching for North American Harvard 2891

That’s the plane that went missing according to the logbook.

Réjeanne had it!

She did not tell me.

She took this with her iPad.

logbook Normand Roy

Now we have the plane and the serial number.

Harvard 2891

But we have much more since yesterday.

A reader whose grandfather was also with 128 Squadron.

 Chuck Redeker

Charles Redeker

My grandfather was involved in the search for P/O Roy and Sgt. Whelan. Based on his log book he had actually flown with P/O Roy about a week before he went missing. Roy flew co-pilot to Dartmouth NS and back to Sydney which took them 2hr 50min according to the log book entry.

My grandfather flew search missions on May 18th, 19th x2, and 20th x2. Based on the notes it looks like Roy and Whelan went down in a HARVARD aircraft. I can scan you the pages from the log book that pertain to Roy and Whelan if you would like. I am working on scanning his entire log book and share the 128 Squadron pages with you to include in your blog. I did see the pictures of him on the blog.

C. R. Redeker

Charles Redeker

He joined the squadron on July 22, 1942, he left Sydney in January 1943 for about 6 weeks to take his Pilot Armament Officers Course in Mountain View, Ontario. He rejoined the squadron in February and in June 1943 was posted to Torbay, Newfoundland with the Squadron. He stayed in Torbay until March 1944 when he was transferred to No. 36 O.T.U in Greenwood NS prior to shipping off to England in July 1944 to later join the 418.

During his time in the 128 he logged time in the following aircraft types:

HARVARD
HURRICANE
HURRICANE XII
HARVARD II B

He logged a total time of 351:45 flying with the 128.

For more on Charles Redeker, click here.

I thought the name sounded familiar.

End of the original post

I saw Réjeanne’s father’s logbook Saturday.

She offered that I take it with me to scan it. I much prefer to scan it later because there was little information about 128 Squadron in it. I much prefer to write about Sgt. Whelan from now on just in case someone find this blog and write a comment like Réjeanne did in December 2013.

RAF Station Charlottetown

I am learning new things as I am reading Jean Baptiste Normand Roy’s file.

I came across this…

No. 31 GRS Charlottetown. He was posted there.

No idea what was this training school for!

So I got curious.

 

RAF Station Charlottetown (Wikipedia)

Whereas the Royal Canadian Air Force was operating its airfield at RCAF Station Summerside and another further to the west at RCAF Station Mount Pleasant, the Charlottetown airfield was to be operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF). Construction was completed and the RAF took over the facility on 15 June 1941, naming it RAF Station Charlottetown.

The BCATP school located at RAF Station Charlottetown was No. 31 General Reconnaissance School (GRS), which flew the Avro Anson. The RAF’s No. 32 Air Navigation School was also located at the airfield until it merged with the RCAF’s No. 2 Air Navigation School in 1944. Like all RAF training facilities in Canada at the time, RAF Station Charlottetown was subject to Royal Canadian Air Force operational and administrative control. RAF stations in Canada during the war were extensions of the British Commonwealth Training Plan until they were officially incorporated into the BCATP in 1942.

 

Being curious is what led me to meet Jean Baptiste Normand Roy’s daughter.

I won’t post any more articles about that pilot. I have met her daughter last Saturday and I showed her all the files I got from Archives Canada. I explained a few things. She showed me personal pictures she had but none were taken during the war.  She showed me the logbook that I will scan later when I meet her again.

One thing was interesting in her father’s logbook.

He flew once with Chuck Redeker on a search party.

Chuck Redeker

Chuck Redeker in Torbay (collection Walter Neil Dove via Greg Bell)

I will have to dig up that story once I have scanned the whole logbook.

If you want to share some information, feel free to contact me using this form.

I am not in this for the money.

Searching for North American Harvard 2891

That’s the plane that went missing according to the logbook.

Réjeanne had it!

She did not tell me.

She took this with her iPad.

logbook Normand Roy

Now we have the plane and the serial number.

Harvard 2891

But we have much more since yesterday.

A reader whose grandfather was also with 128 Squadron.

 Chuck Redeker

Charles Redeker

My grandfather was involved in the search for P/O Roy and Sgt. Whelan. Based on his log book he had actually flown with P/O Roy about a week before he went missing. Roy flew co-pilot to Dartmouth NS and back to Sydney which took them 2hr 50min according to the log book entry. My grandfather flew search missions on May 18th, 19th x2, and 20th x2. Based on the notes it looks like Roy and Whelan went down in a HARVARD aircraft. I can scan you the pages from the log book that pertain to Roy and Whelan if you would like. I am working on scanning his entire log book and share the 128 Squadron pages with you to include in your blog. I did see the pictures of him on the blog.

C. R. Redeker

Charles Redeker

He joined the squadron on July 22, 1942, he left Sydney in January 1943 for about 6 weeks to take his Pilot Armament Officers Course in Mountain View, Ontario. He rejoined the squadron in February and in June 1943 was posted to Torbay, Newfoundland with the Squadron. He stayed in Torbay until March 1944 when he was transferred to No. 36 O.T.U in Greenwood NS prior to shipping off to England in July 1944 to later join the 418.

During his time in the 128 he logged time in the following aircraft types:

HARVARD
HURRICANE
HURRICANE XII
HARVARD II B

He logged a total time of 351:45 flying with the 128.

For more on Charles Redeker, click here.

I thought the name sounded familiar.